Xinhuanet

Commentary: South China Sea no showcase for U.S.-Japanese alliance

English.news.cn 2015-04-29 14:06:35

by Xinhua Writer Zhu Dongyang

BEIJING, April 29 (Xinhua) -- The South China Sea unexpectedly became a showcase of the U.S.-Japanese alliance when U.S. President Barack Obama met visiting Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe amid worldwide cries for the latter to apologize for Tokyo's past war crimes.

After a high-profile meeting with the Japanese leader in Washington on Tuesday, Obama told a joint White House press conference that his country and Japan "share a concern" about China's activities in the South China Sea, accusing China of "flexing muscles" in the waters.

Such preposterous rhetoric betrayed the two's attempt to muddy the waters for their ulterior calculation, and contradicted their following claims that their alliance should not "be seen as a provocation" and they "welcome China's peaceful rise."

For starters, the South China Sea disputes are between China and other claimants and do not need the meddling of outsiders. Nor should they be used as a pretext for cementing an anachronic security arrangement that now only brings about more uncertainties.

In stark contrast with the two countries' shallow trick of meddling around, China has repeatedly expressed its resolve and sincerity to settle the disputes with related nations through peaceful negotiations.

Moreover, Abe's attempt to use the South China Sea rows as a distraction from the history issue will prove futile. As long as Tokyo refuses to face up to Japan's WWII atrocities and continues to whitewash them, Japan's neighbors and the broader international community will never loosen the screw.

Sadly, despite cries of the U.S. public and East Asian nations, Abe's statements since his arrival on U.S. soil have been filled with deceptive calls for peace and elusive on historical issues. That is very disappointing.

Such an attitude should also be an insult to Uncle Sam, which suffered huge casualties and paid a great sacrifice to defeat Japan in WWII. The 1941 Pearl Harbor attack and the deceit behind it deserve a good review.

Instead of ill-grounded finger-pointing, Washington and Tokyo, which both share huge stakes in the Asian-Pacific region, should honor their commitments to world peace and prosperity with real actions.

An enduring prospect of peace and prosperity cannot be unlocked unless the two countries are ready to engage in sincere cooperation with China.

Related:

Obama-Abe summit overshadowed by anger over history issues

WASHINGTON, April 28 (Xinhua) -- U.S. President Barack Obama held talks with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at the White House on Tuesday, reaffirming ties between the allies on issues ranging from security to trade.  Full story

Commentary: Obama's onus to keep Abe away from whitewashing history

BEIJING, April 28 (Xinhua) -- As Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's America trip is closely watched by Japan's neighbors, the host, U.S. President Barack Obama, is obligated to keep his guest away from wayward and dishonest comments on history, which may dampen the hard-won upward trend of relations in the region.  Full story

U.S., Japan unveil new defense guidelines

NEW YORK, April 27 (Xinhua) -- U.S. and Japan on Monday announced new guidelines for bilateral defense cooperation, allowing Japan's self defense forces to take on more ambitious global role that the Shinzo Abe administration has been seeking. Full story

[Editor: Lu Hui]
 
Commentary: South China Sea no showcase for U.S.-Japanese alliance
                 English.news.cn | 2015-04-29 14:06:35 | Editor: Lu Hui

by Xinhua Writer Zhu Dongyang

BEIJING, April 29 (Xinhua) -- The South China Sea unexpectedly became a showcase of the U.S.-Japanese alliance when U.S. President Barack Obama met visiting Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe amid worldwide cries for the latter to apologize for Tokyo's past war crimes.

After a high-profile meeting with the Japanese leader in Washington on Tuesday, Obama told a joint White House press conference that his country and Japan "share a concern" about China's activities in the South China Sea, accusing China of "flexing muscles" in the waters.

Such preposterous rhetoric betrayed the two's attempt to muddy the waters for their ulterior calculation, and contradicted their following claims that their alliance should not "be seen as a provocation" and they "welcome China's peaceful rise."

For starters, the South China Sea disputes are between China and other claimants and do not need the meddling of outsiders. Nor should they be used as a pretext for cementing an anachronic security arrangement that now only brings about more uncertainties.

In stark contrast with the two countries' shallow trick of meddling around, China has repeatedly expressed its resolve and sincerity to settle the disputes with related nations through peaceful negotiations.

Moreover, Abe's attempt to use the South China Sea rows as a distraction from the history issue will prove futile. As long as Tokyo refuses to face up to Japan's WWII atrocities and continues to whitewash them, Japan's neighbors and the broader international community will never loosen the screw.

Sadly, despite cries of the U.S. public and East Asian nations, Abe's statements since his arrival on U.S. soil have been filled with deceptive calls for peace and elusive on historical issues. That is very disappointing.

Such an attitude should also be an insult to Uncle Sam, which suffered huge casualties and paid a great sacrifice to defeat Japan in WWII. The 1941 Pearl Harbor attack and the deceit behind it deserve a good review.

Instead of ill-grounded finger-pointing, Washington and Tokyo, which both share huge stakes in the Asian-Pacific region, should honor their commitments to world peace and prosperity with real actions.

An enduring prospect of peace and prosperity cannot be unlocked unless the two countries are ready to engage in sincere cooperation with China.

Related:

Obama-Abe summit overshadowed by anger over history issues

WASHINGTON, April 28 (Xinhua) -- U.S. President Barack Obama held talks with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe at the White House on Tuesday, reaffirming ties between the allies on issues ranging from security to trade.  Full story

Commentary: Obama's onus to keep Abe away from whitewashing history

BEIJING, April 28 (Xinhua) -- As Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's America trip is closely watched by Japan's neighbors, the host, U.S. President Barack Obama, is obligated to keep his guest away from wayward and dishonest comments on history, which may dampen the hard-won upward trend of relations in the region.  Full story

U.S., Japan unveil new defense guidelines

NEW YORK, April 27 (Xinhua) -- U.S. and Japan on Monday announced new guidelines for bilateral defense cooperation, allowing Japan's self defense forces to take on more ambitious global role that the Shinzo Abe administration has been seeking. Full story

分享
China voices "serious concern" over ASEAN statement on South China Sea
Chinese vessel Haixun-21 on patrol mission in South China Sea
China's patrol vessels set out for patrol mission in South China Sea
China's activities in South China Sea good for maintaining security, navigation freedom: ambassador
Commentary: Japan's meddling in South China Sea at wrong time, wrong place
58-strong Chinese gov't medical team arrives in Nepal for rescue
58-strong Chinese gov't medical team arrives in Nepal for rescue
Soldiers of Xinjiang border defense unit attend drill in NW China
Soldiers of Xinjiang border defense unit attend drill in NW China
Chinese vice president meets Italian foreign minister
Chinese vice president meets Italian foreign minister
China's rescue materials arrive in Nepal
China's rescue materials arrive in Nepal
Indonesia executes eight drug, murder convicts
Indonesia executes eight drug, murder convicts
Protesters gather in Baltimore of U.S.
Protesters gather in Baltimore of U.S.
Death toll of Nepal quake rises to over 5,000
Death toll of Nepal quake rises to over 5,000
Venezuelan president speaks during program "In Contact With Maduro"
Venezuelan president speaks during program "In Contact With Maduro"
Back to Top Close
010020070750000000000000011102351341956831