Commentary: Japan's meddling in South China Sea nothing but miscalculation
English.news.cn   2015-06-22 16:42:37

by Wang Haiqing

BEIJING, June 22 (Xinhua) -- In the latest sequel to Tokyo's meddling in the South China Sea, a patrol aircraft of the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force landed in the Philippine city of Puerto Princesa Sunday to prepare for a flight over the contested body of water later this week.

The planned flight, like every other move taken by Japan regarding the South China Sea, is designed by Tokyo to achieve gains on this new front, but such calculations are unrealistic.

For starters, Tokyo's recent obsession to meddle in the South China Sea aims to press Beijing to divert resources from the East China Sea, where China-Japan tension over the Diaoyu Islands, which was started by Japan's nationalization of the islands, has been rising.

This seemingly clever maneuver is only short-sighted, for Beijing will probably not be convinced next time when Tokyo says it sincerely wants to improve bilateral ties.

By seeking to portray China as a bully in the South China Sea and ganging up with China's rival claimants there, Tokyo also aims to create the right atmosphere for the adoption of a new package of security bills which will significantly expand the scope of overseas operations by the country's self-defense forces.

However, these schemes will do little to change the fact that the proposed security bills are facing vehement opposition domestically and internationally, since exercising the so-called "right to collective self-defense" violates the country's pacifist constitution and evokes the memories of Japan's militarist past.

Last but not least, by muddying the waters in the South China Sea, Tokyo also aims to divert increasingly intensive global attention on Japan's lack of remorse over its atrocities during World War II (WWII), nearly 70 years after its surrender.

Tokyo needs to be reminded that any attempt to obscure the focus on Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's planned statement to mark the 70th anniversary of the end of WWII is futile and will only serve to deepen the mistrust toward Japan.

It is known to all that although several countries are involved in the territorial disputes over the South China Sea, waterways there have never been blocked and navigation freedom has never been compromised.

Japan, which is not a party to the disputes in South China Sea, should abandon all attempts to stir waves in the area.

Facts have shown that China and other claimants are fully capable of safeguarding maritime security in the area. They have also demonstrated the will to find a peaceful solution to their disputes.

Editor: An
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Commentary: Japan's meddling in South China Sea nothing but miscalculation

English.news.cn 2015-06-22 16:42:37

by Wang Haiqing

BEIJING, June 22 (Xinhua) -- In the latest sequel to Tokyo's meddling in the South China Sea, a patrol aircraft of the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force landed in the Philippine city of Puerto Princesa Sunday to prepare for a flight over the contested body of water later this week.

The planned flight, like every other move taken by Japan regarding the South China Sea, is designed by Tokyo to achieve gains on this new front, but such calculations are unrealistic.

For starters, Tokyo's recent obsession to meddle in the South China Sea aims to press Beijing to divert resources from the East China Sea, where China-Japan tension over the Diaoyu Islands, which was started by Japan's nationalization of the islands, has been rising.

This seemingly clever maneuver is only short-sighted, for Beijing will probably not be convinced next time when Tokyo says it sincerely wants to improve bilateral ties.

By seeking to portray China as a bully in the South China Sea and ganging up with China's rival claimants there, Tokyo also aims to create the right atmosphere for the adoption of a new package of security bills which will significantly expand the scope of overseas operations by the country's self-defense forces.

However, these schemes will do little to change the fact that the proposed security bills are facing vehement opposition domestically and internationally, since exercising the so-called "right to collective self-defense" violates the country's pacifist constitution and evokes the memories of Japan's militarist past.

Last but not least, by muddying the waters in the South China Sea, Tokyo also aims to divert increasingly intensive global attention on Japan's lack of remorse over its atrocities during World War II (WWII), nearly 70 years after its surrender.

Tokyo needs to be reminded that any attempt to obscure the focus on Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's planned statement to mark the 70th anniversary of the end of WWII is futile and will only serve to deepen the mistrust toward Japan.

It is known to all that although several countries are involved in the territorial disputes over the South China Sea, waterways there have never been blocked and navigation freedom has never been compromised.

Japan, which is not a party to the disputes in South China Sea, should abandon all attempts to stir waves in the area.

Facts have shown that China and other claimants are fully capable of safeguarding maritime security in the area. They have also demonstrated the will to find a peaceful solution to their disputes.

[Editor: huaxia]
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